cynthia lummis

Gage Skidmore via Flickr Creative Commons

CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — Alvin Wiederspahn, a former Wyoming state legislator and the husband of U.S. Rep. Cynthia Lummis, has died at age 65.

Wiederspahn-Radomsky Chapel of the Chimes funeral director Amy Peterson confirmed Wiederspahn's death and says arrangements are being handled by the funeral home his parents started.

She says she does not know how Wiederspahn died.

Incumbent US Representative Cynthia Lummis easily secured her party’s nomination in Tuesday's primary election, and likely also a fourth term in the House. The AP reports her general election challenger, Democrat Richard Grayson, has not been campaigning.

This week the EPA unveiled a new rule to drastically cut carbon emissions from the nation's power plants. While Wyoming Republicans say it will devastate the economy, Matt Laslo reports from Washington that some experts say their outdated thinking has set the state back in the new energy economy. 

The White House isn't waiting around for this Congress to help it tackle climate change. The new EPA rule will require Wyoming to slash it's carbon emissions by 19 percent. Wyoming Congresswoman Cynthia Lummis says the state's energy producers are worried. 

In September a Congressional subcommittee will hold a hearing in Casper as Congress takes another crack at reforming the Endangered Species Act. 

Wyoming Congresswoman Cynthia Lummis has for years been supportive of reforming the ESA.  While she is quick to acknowledge that it has been a good law, Lummis is frustrated that once something gets on the endangered species list it rarely comes off.  She joins Bob Beck to discuss this.

Wyoming Congresswoman Cynthia Lummis says she supports efforts in the House of Representatives to de-fund the Affordable Care Act. 

Lummis says there are too many problems with the health care overhaul, starting with the individual mandate. That says everyone must purchase insurance or face a fine.  The idea is that with more people getting health insurance, health care costs will go down.  But Lummis met with a group of young male Wyoming workers who convinced her that the idea won’t work.

This week President Obama announced he's going to attempt to combat climate change from the Oval Office. Wyoming's three Republicans in Congress are none too happy with his plan. As Matt Laslo reports, they say it could cripple the state's economy and hit your pocket. 

MATT LASLO: Climate change wasn't really a part of the 20-12 election, so the president surprised many when he promised to deal with global warming in his second inaugural address. Now he's coming out swinging again...charging Republicans with being deaf to the scientific community. 

Henrichsen attacks Lummis for losing AML funds

Nov 1, 2012

During tonight’s Congressional debate, Democrat Chris Henrichsen attacked Republican Rep. Cynthia Lummis for losing hundreds of millions of dollars of Abandoned Mine Lands money that were destined for Wyoming.

Coal-producing states receive AML funds in order to pay for mine reclamation, but Wyoming used a portion of the money for buildings, infrastructure and other projects. This fall, Congress voted to severely limit the amount the Cowboy State gets.

Henrichsen says Lummis failed in her duties because she failed to stop the measure.

This November, incumbent US House representative Cynthia Lummis will defend her seat against a democrat and three third-party candidates. Among them, physician Daniel Cummings, Constitution Party candidate and owner of a family practice in Casper, Wyoming. If elected to the US house, he says he would do his part to stop any increased spending, which he believes could eventually create a state of national violence and collapse.

Cynthia Lummis

Rep. Cynthia Lummis is running for her third term in the US House of Representatives.  Lummis is a fiscal conservative who is a member of the appropriations committee.  She joins Bob Beck on the campaign trail.

Two of Wyoming’s three Republicans in Congress have signed a pledge to never raise taxes. The Taxpayer Protection Pledge is vilified by critics who say its sponsor, Grover Norquist, now controls the Republican Party when it comes to tax policy. Correspondent Matt Laslo reports that those two Wyoming lawmakers are now moving away from the Pledge.  

Lummis presents Soda Ash bill to committee

Apr 26, 2012

    Wyoming Congresswoman Cynthia Lummis urged the U-S House Natural Resources Committee not to allow the two-percent royalty rate for soda ash to increase six percent, as is being proposed by the Obama Administration.  Lummis told the committee Thursday that the two percent royalty rate has helped the industry.

State Representative Cynthia Lummis joins us to talk about a number of issues affecting the state. The Wyoming Republican most recently had a discussion with the head of the EPA concerning water pollution in Pavillion.  She tells Wyoming Public Radio’s Bob Beck the good news is that there seems to be a dialogue.

Wyoming Congresswoman Cynthia Lummis will once again ask for congressional support to keep people from suing over Wyoming’s ability to manage wolves. Such legislation was approved on behalf of Montana and Idaho.  Lummis failed in a previous attempt in December, but she is more optimistic following the Wyoming legislature’s passage of wolf management legislation.  Lummis says she will also be watching closely to make sure that federal officials support the state. 

Breaking with some members of their party, 40 House Republicans including Wyoming Representative Cynthia Lummis are urging the congressional' supercommittee on to consider all options for raising revenue as they hunt for ways to trim the national debt, including taxes.