historic preservation

fastfilmfestcheyenne.com

Friday is the kickoff for Cheyenne’s Fast Filmmaking Festival. It gives contestants two weeks to film and produce a film highlighting one of the capital city’s historic landmarks. Wyoming Public Radio’s Micah Schweizer spoke with festival producer Alan O’Hashi.

JenTen Productions

Barns don’t just hold hay. They hold cultural and architectural meaning. A ‘Barn Bash’ Friday, September 19 at the Center for the Arts in Jackson will explore the value of these agrarian artifacts through the premier of a new documentary, a panel discussion, and a barn dance.

commons.wikimedia.org

Historic sandstone buildings, granite boulders, giant spruce trees: step onto the University of Wyoming campus, and you know where you are. As new construction projects begin, the University wants to make sure the designs adhere to its iconic image. To that end, the University is working with a team of architectural consultants to come up with guidelines for how to preserve its historic character. 

Wyoming_Jackrabbit via Flickr Creative Commons

The University of Wyoming is working to update its preservation plan for historic buildings on campus. The current preservation plan was written in 1999 and is now out of date since many buildings now qualify as historic that once did not.

With lots of construction and renovation taking place on campus, UW's Interim Director of Facilities Planning Larry Blake says new guidelines are necessary.

Highway Teepee: A Roadside Mystery

Dec 17, 2013
Erin Dorbin

Chances are, if you’ve driven the stretch east of Cheyenne along I-80 or Old Highway 30, you’ve seen it--that colossal white and turquoise roadside gem, the Teepee. You’ve probably also wondered, who lives there? Or simply, why a teepee? Producer Erin Dorbin sent us this postcard with some questions from Egbert.

Erin Dorbin

This summer,  the Wyoming State Historic Preservation Office received a grant to survey buildings and landscapes along the I-80 corridor. Because I-80 and old US-30 roughly follow the nation’s first transcontinental highway, the project was called the ‘Lincoln Highway Survey.’ In honor of the highway’s 100th anniversary, we’ll make some stops along the road this week. Wyoming Public Radio’s Micah Schweizer begins our series by speaking with Beth King and Erin Dorbin from the State Historic Preservation Office.

An environmental consulting firm is considering anti-erosion measures for a pair of historical sites east of Gillette.

 This summer, the Bureau of Reclamation hired S.W.C.A, formerly Steven W. Carothers and Associates, to map and collect samples at archeological sites near Keyhole Reservoir which had suffered water damage in 2011. The bureau feared the sites are vulnerable to erosion.

 S.W.C.A Field Director Andrew Owens says the historical sites were home to early cattle ranchers and Native Americans, respectively.