History

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Lynne Cheney and her husband, former Vice President Dick Cheney, will be in Laramie on February 17th discussing her new book called James Madison:  A Life Reconsidered. The Cheney's will discuss the book at the Marian Rochelle Gateway Center at the University of Wyoming. The discussion begins at 4 p.m.

Caroline Ballard

Wyoming Public Radio’s Caroline Ballard sat down with Phil Roberts, a history professor at the University of Wyoming, to understand more about the history of booms and busts in Wyoming. He says it's a cycle the state has gone through many times before.

karenschutte.com

Karen Schutte grew up in Wyoming's Big Horn Basin. “Seed Of The Volga” is the second of a trilogy that records her family’s history of German immigration. In 2014, Karen’s work was awarded the PEN Award from the Rocky Mountain Fictions Writers.

Micah Schweizer

Nearly 150 years ago, Mormon pioneers set out from the Midwest, bound for Salt Lake City. They walked, pulling their belongings in wooden handcarts. Two groups got a late start and were stranded in Wyoming by a devastating October blizzard. And for the past 20 years, thousands of Mormon teenagers have been returning to that site to follow in the footsteps of their ancestors.

When the blizzard struck on October 19th, 1856, the lagging handcart companies were still weeks from Salt Lake City. More than 200 people died of exhaustion, hunger, and cold.

Rebecca Huntington

Chef Eric Bartle and girlfriend, Sara Kundelius, moved in the dead of winter from Portland, Oregon, to Turpin Meadow Ranch. The guest ranch is nestled at the end of the Buffalo Valley Road, on the edge of the Teton Wilderness, one of the most remote places in the Lower 48 states.

The couple loves to forage for locally grown foods and brought with them a supply of homemade jarred and canned delicacies to incorporate into the ranch’s menu. They share stories about that first trip to the ranch and their passion for home and forest-grown food.

Stories about riding a horse to school.

Subscribe to the Wyoming Stories podcast here.

Miles Bryan

When it opened in 1963 Sheridan’s King’s Saddlery was a small shop serving surrounding ranching and horse backing community. In the forty years that followed King’s became an institution. Founder Don King’s distinctive Sheridan style leatherwork is the finest in its class, and enthusiasts come from around the world to see the saddlery and the attached museum.

JenTen Productions

Barns don’t just hold hay. They hold cultural and architectural meaning. A ‘Barn Bash’ Friday, September 19 at the Center for the Arts in Jackson will explore the value of these agrarian artifacts through the premier of a new documentary, a panel discussion, and a barn dance.

Bob Beck

On September 18th and 19th the University of Wyoming American Heritage Center and a number of sponsors will be hosting what should be a fascinating symposium on Immigration. Leslie Waggener with the American Heritage Center explains the purpose of the symposium.

Stories about getting into trouble.

Subscribe to the Wyoming Stories podcast here.

Zack Godfrey Flickr Creative Commons

It's all happened to us one time or another. Mispronouncing words. Now...how about trying to correctly say a city, county, or landmark in the Equality state?

We asked listeners to help make a list of commonly mispronounced Wyoming places. Below are the results! If you have a favorite word you think should be listed, tell us in the comments below and use the hashtag #wyowords on Twitter.

Gros Ventre (Grow-vont) Gros Ventre River, Mountains, and Wilderness. Visitors to Wyoming often pronounce the name as (Gross-vent-ree).

Miles Bryan

A group of artists marking 1821 border between the United States and Mexico traveled through Wyoming over the weekend.

Marcos Ramirez and David Taylor are the artists behind the project, called ‘Delimitations.’ It aims to trace the original, 2,300-mile border between the U.S. and Mexico.

That historic border runs through Medicine Bow National Forest here in Wyoming.

americanindian.net

In coming years, visitors to Wyoming’s Wind River Indian Reservation will see new historical perspectives on roadside signs and markers. That’s the proposed outcome of the new Wind River Interpretive Plan. It's believed to be the first such collaboration between tribes and state government on a reservation-wide interpretive plan.

Lorin and Mary Ann Moench work for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints at Martin’s Cove Historic site.  This spot in south-central Wyoming marks an important point along the Mormon trail.  European converts sailed to the East Coast of the U.S., purchased supplies and handcarts, and traveled with handcart companies to Salt Lake City.  In 1856 two handcart companies began their journey late, causing them to face unforgiving Wyoming storms.

Micah Schweizer

Joan Paige’s family has lived in the Equality State for almost as long as it’s existed. In 1889, her grandfather, John Mahoney, was stationed just outside of Rawlins at Fort Steele. In this story, she tells of circumstances that brought him west, and the dubious nature of late-19th century frontier towns.

UW Professor of history Phil Roberts tells the story of how Thomas Boylan—the late owner and operator of The Fossil Cabin outside of Medicine Bow—protected the identity of local Japanese Americans from relocation officers during World War II.

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