national wildlife federation

Darrah Perez

The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, the National Wildlife Federation and the Eastern Shoshone Tribe invited participants to witness the release of ten more bison south of Pilot Butte on the Wind River Reservation.

Jola Lebeau, an Eastern Shoshone tribal member, said a prayer before the release of the ten bison.

“Grandfather Creator you see us here, we are standing here with the sun to the east, that gateway of love. We thank you for this beautiful day and that the buffalo that came here from Montana, that they will love living here upon our lands,”Lebeau said.

Courtesy NWF.Org

It’s been quite a year for major forest fires, in fact it’s been a major few years. The fires are impacting wildlife and communities. The issues range from climate change to poor forest management due to the lack of proper funding. National Wildlife Federation President and CEO Collin O’Mara recently testified on the issue before Congress. He tells Wyoming Public Radio’s Bob Beck that he’s optimistic that members of Congress are interested in finding a solution. 

Alexis Bonogofsky

It’s been almost a year since the Eastern Shoshone Tribe released its first ten bison onto 300 acres of the Wind River Reservation. Next week, the tribe will release ten more. This time, though, the animals will come from the National Bison Range in Montana. The last batch came from a herd in Iowa.

Jason Baldes with the Eastern Shoshone Tribal Buffalo Restoration Program said the goal is to build a genetically pure herd by getting animals from different places.

Bureau of Land Management

A new rule proposed by the Bureau of Land Management could cut years off of lengthy land use planning debate. The agency said “Planning 2.0” would streamline procedures that have taken up to eight years in the past.

A major component of the initiative includes more opportunities for early public involvement, rather than later on when the agency has already spent years working on a plan.

Cynthia Lummis

Environmentalists around the West are looking hard at what a Trump administration means for issues like wildlife conservation and federal land takeovers.

National Wildlife Federation President Collin O’Mara said, on the campaign trail, Donald Trump and his son, Donald Trump Junior, both expressed disapproval for the idea of putting federal lands in state control.

It isn’t easy to get your kids to play outdoors, but the National Wildlife Federation is encouraging families to make that a New Year’s resolution.  The “Be Out There” campaign offers tips and advice to parents who pledge to help get their kids to play outdoors every week. 

Campaign manager Lindsay Legendre says their survey found that 94 percent of parents say kids aren’t getting enough time outside. The barriers include things such as weather, concerns about safety, and the lure of technology. Legendre says their website offers some solutions.

A new National Wildlife Federation Poll shows that protecting public lands and addressing climate change is big for those who hunt and fish.   Given a choice between protecting America’s public lands and prioritizing the production of oil, gas and coal, 49 percent want to protect public lands and just 35 percent choose fossil fuel production.   John Gale of the Wildlife Federation says maintaining and improving access to public lands also ranked high on the priority list.