oil boom

The energy industry can have an impact on politics in Wyoming, but other states as well. In North Dakota political spending is way up, with 17 million spent this year, more than double what was spent in 2010. Inside Energy’s Emily Guerin reports on why the stakes have suddenly gotten so high.

North Dakota has always been a friendly, easy place to vote. It is the only state in the country without voter registration, and precincts are small enough that poll volunteers often recognize people who come through the door.

Robert Verzo via Flickr

Construction contractors in Wyoming are struggling to find enough workers.

Wyoming Construction Coalition President Josh Carnahan says energy development -- particularly oil -- is fueling a rapid rise in construction jobs around the state.

“It impacts prices because we need to recruit employees to come in and do the work,” Carnahan says. The only way on a short term to attract employees is pay them a little higher and offer them a little better benefits.”

Willow Belden

In October, we reported that Chesapeake Energy had drilled a series of oil wells near Douglas, very close to people’s houses. Chesapeake says the area will likely continue to be a core drilling region. That has some area residents uneasy. Wyoming Public Radio’s Willow Belden reports.