Open Spaces

Open Spaces
4:18 pm
Fri September 26, 2014

Democrat Mike Ceballos Makes His Bid For State Superintendent

Mike Ceballos is trying to make a major career change. After leading the massive telecommunications firm Qwest, Ceballos returned to College to get his doctorate and now is the Democratic candidate for State Superintendent of Public Instruction. Ceballos has served on the Governor’s P-16 council which is intended to improved education in the state.

Read more
Open Spaces
4:13 pm
Fri September 26, 2014

Sexual Assault Remains Underreported In Wyoming – Why One Woman Is Speaking Out

The STOP Violence Project at The University of Wyoming offers free condoms with messages of consent.
Caroline Ballard

This past Sunday the White House released an ad campaign to address sexual assault on college campuses. It uses celebrities to promote speaking up if you suspect a sexual assault is in the works. But even with renewed awareness efforts, Sexual Assault remains the most underreported crime in the United States. Wyoming is no exception.

Read more
Open Spaces
4:03 pm
Fri September 26, 2014

Building A Local Food System In A Rural State

Brad Holliday's mobile chicken coop.
Credit Melodie Edwards

It's not just in big cities that people are buying up kale and bison jerky. Rural Wyomingites are trolling farmer's markets for purple tomatoes and emu oil, too. The state now has 49 farmer’s markets that have done over two million dollars in revenue just this year. But some farmers and food advocates who want to expand the availability of artisan foods say Wyoming is struggling with some deep challenges. 

In his pumpkin patch, eleven-year-old Michael Shaw pokes around under broad, drooping leaves. He’s not sure of any of the names because he lost his seed map.

Read more
Open Spaces
3:53 pm
Fri September 26, 2014

Residents Concerned Over Number Of Yellowstone Wildlife Killed

Moose with new calf.
Credit Penny Preston

Cody – Grizzly bears, moose, bison, and many other Yellowstone area animals are hit and killed by speeding motorists every year. But now, a baby moose that made newspaper and magazine headlines when it survived a raging river, has been photographed all alone. Locals fear it is orphaned and unlikely to survive, because a motorist killed its mother. It’s led to a renewed discussion over speed limits and signs in forested areas of northwest Wyoming.

A heavy snowpack swelled the Shoshone River this spring.

Read more
Open Spaces
3:44 pm
Fri September 26, 2014

Art Show Highlights Wyoming Bamboo Rod Builder

Johnson planes the bamboo.
Melodie Edwards

Is a bamboo fly rod “art?” A new exhibit in Cheyenne proposes that it is. The Wyoming State Museum has assembled over 70 crafts, all related to hunting and fishing like engraved rifles, pack saddles and taxidermy that highlights Wyoming’s long history of outdoor life. But many of the artists were skeptical about having their work displayed as art since most of them build their work only to use in the field. Laramie bamboo rod builder, Jerry Johnson, who has a fly rod in the show.

“You just take it, put a knife, put whatever you’re going to split with…”

Read more
Open Spaces
3:36 pm
Fri September 26, 2014

At King's Saddlery, "Laid Back Western" Lives On

King's owner Bruce King.
Miles Bryan

When it opened in 1963 Sheridan’s King’s Saddlery was a small shop serving surrounding ranching and horse backing community. In the forty years that followed King’s became an institution. Founder Don King’s distinctive Sheridan style leatherwork is the finest in its class, and enthusiasts come from around the world to see the saddlery and the attached museum.

Read more
Open Spaces
6:07 pm
Fri September 19, 2014

September 19th, 2014

Credit Bob Beck

Wyoming Lawmakers Battle The Feds Over Water

There's a water war going on in the nation's capital that has Wyoming lawmakers and land owners worried the federal government is soon going to be regulating most every drop of water that falls from the sky.

37-Year Lawsuit Settles Issue Of Tribal Water Rights

Read more
Open Spaces
6:05 pm
Fri September 19, 2014

37-Year Lawsuit Settles Issue Of Tribal Water Rights

One of 7 new fish ladders on the Wind River Indian Reservation.
Credit Melodie Edwards

Earlier this month in a Worland courthouse, a judge signed a final decree that brought to end what’s probably the longest-running lawsuit in Wyoming history. After 37 years, the lawsuit decided who exactly owns the water rights in and around the Wind River Indian Reservation. Those involved in the suit are now looking to the future.

Read more
Open Spaces
5:32 pm
Fri September 19, 2014

Wyoming Lawmakers Battle The Feds Over Water

Laramie River
Credit Bob Beck

There's a water war going on in the nation's capital that has Wyoming lawmakers and land owners worried the federal government is soon going to be regulating most every drop of water that falls from the sky.

Read more
Open Spaces
5:22 pm
Fri September 19, 2014

Westwood High School Moves To Gillette College Campus

The new Westwood High School building on Gillette College's campus.
Aaron Schrank

Students at Westwood High School—an alternative school in Gillette—are starting out the new school year in a brand new building. That means more space and state-of-the-art technology—but perhaps most important—a new location. That’s because Westwood, where most students don’t see themselves as college-bound, put up its new school building smack dab on a college campus.

Read more
Open Spaces
5:12 pm
Fri September 19, 2014

INSIDE ENERGY: Dark Side Of The Boom: The Takeaway

Credit Blastcube

This week, Wyoming Public Radio aired a series of stories on workplace fatalities in the oil and gas industry. The series looked North Dakota’s high oil and gas fatality rate, Wyoming’s response to its own rising death toll, and whether there are lessons to be learned from the commercial fishing industry in Alaska, which has cut fatalities in half in the last decade. Emily Guerin of Prairie Public Radio and Stephanie Joyce of Wyoming Public Radio share some of their takeaways after reporting the series.

Read more
Open Spaces
5:04 pm
Fri September 19, 2014

Wyoming Debates The Future Of The Death Penalty

Defense Attorney Vaughn Neubauer.

Recently a legislative committee gave its support to a bill that would have Wyoming use firing squads for the death penalty as opposed to lethal injection. For a variety of reasons, States are finding it difficult acquire the drugs that have traditionally been used to put people to death. Some states have tried to replace the drugs and it has led to some botched executions. One issue that could come before the legislature this year is whether the state should get rid of the death penalty all together.

Read more
Open Spaces
4:52 pm
Fri September 19, 2014

In Wyoming, Public Data Is Heading To The Cloud

Engineer Courtney Thompson at the future home of Wyoming's state data.
Credit Miles Bryan

Outsourcing government functions to private companies has long been a popular idea here in Wyoming. Now the state is leading the nation in taking that trend into the digital age. Wyoming will soon transfer much of its public data to the care of private companies, which will host it on the internet. State officials say this so called “cloud” hosting is cheaper and more efficient than state owned data centers. But putting all that public data in corporate hands has some privacy advocates nervous.

Read more
Open Spaces
4:32 pm
Fri September 19, 2014

The Risk That Made Me Happier

Credit Willow Belden

Former Wyoming Public Radio reporter and host Willow Belden left her job this spring to hike the Colorado Trail. That’s a 500-mile path through the Rockies, from Denver to Durango. She did the journey alone.

The Colorado Trail crosses eight mountain ranges, and climbs nearly three times the height of Mount Everest. It’s mostly above 10,000 feet, so the air is thin, there’s significant danger of lightning strikes, and it often freezes at night. About 400 people attempt the trail each year, but only 150 make it to Durango.

Read more
Open Spaces
4:09 pm
Fri September 19, 2014

A Wall To Divide Constructed – And Crumbled – On UW Campus

A bystander takes the first swing at the wall.
Caroline Ballard

The Berlin Wall came down in East Germany 25 years ago, but last week a new wall went up here in Wyoming. Wyoming Public Radio’s Caroline Ballard finds out why history is repeating itself.

Young adults with spray paint cans stand in front of a colorful canvas. They graffiti the 32-foot long wall with calls for freedom, unity and love.

The structure is topped with barbed wire and is manned by American and East German guards. No, this isn’t Berlin circa 1989. It’s 2014, and this is the south end of the University of Wyoming.

Read more
Open Spaces
4:09 pm
Fri September 19, 2014

"Altitude Adjustment" Author Recounts Adjusting To Wyoming

Credit Mary Beth Baptiste

After her divorce in the early 90s, Mary Beth Baptiste moved to Grand Teton National Park to work as a seasonal employee. Her memoir Altitude Adjustment: A Quest for Love, Home, and Meaning in the Tetons was published this Spring by TwoDot/Globe Pequot Press, and it chronicles her first years at the park.

Read more
Open Spaces
3:13 pm
Fri September 12, 2014

Getting To The Core Of Common Core

The Education Forum panel: Amy Edmonds, Jayne Wingate, Aaron Schrank, Kathy Vetter, and Mark Stock.
Diana Denison

Wyoming Public Media's Education Reporter, Aaron Schrank, moderated a discussion on Common Core issues in Wyoming on September 10, 2014. Panelists included University of Wyoming Assistant Professor of Educational Leadership Mark Stock, Wyoming Education Association President Kathy Vetter, Wyoming Liberty Group's Amy Edmonds and Cheyenne South High School Math Teacher Jayne Wingate.

You can watch the forum on Wyoming PBS on September 29 at 8:00pm, September 30 at 1:00pm and on October 5 at 11:00am.

Read more
Open Spaces
5:36 pm
Fri September 5, 2014

September 5th, 2014

Wyoming Lawmakers Fight For Conservative Health Bill

During the last two elections Wyoming Republicans campaigned on repealing and replacing so-called Obamacare – but House Republicans have yet to vote on a replacement. Matt Laslo has a look from Washington on the debate dividing Republicans in Congress. 

Read more
Open Spaces
5:14 pm
Fri September 5, 2014

Wyoming Lawmakers Fight For Conservative Health Bill

During the last two elections Wyoming Republicans campaigned on repealing and replacing so-called Obamacare – but House Republicans have yet to vote on a replacement. Matt Laslo has a look from Washington on the debate dividing Republicans in Congress.

Read more
Open Spaces
5:03 pm
Fri September 5, 2014

INSIDE ENERGY: If You Read Only One Story On Health And Fracking, Read This One

Anti-fracking activitists pose with "fracking flavoured" water outside the European Parliament. Image from Greensefa via Flickr, used with a Creative Commons Attribution License.
Credit C European Union 2012

If you live right next to a drilling rig, or your kids go to school beside a fracking site, or your county is suddenly littered with well pads  -- are there health risks? That’s a question that’s been asked from Pennsylvania to North Dakota, from Colorado to Texas as more and more people find themselves and their towns in the midst of an unprecedented energy boom.

Read more
Open Spaces
4:57 pm
Fri September 5, 2014

Wyoming Democrats Need To Overcome Obstacles

It’s been 8 years since Wyoming has elected a Democrat to statewide office. This year candidate for Governor Pete Gosar and Superintendent Candidate Mike Ceballos are hoping to break through. But it won’t be easy. The Executive Director of the Wyoming Democratic Party is Robin Van Ausdall. She’s worked on several campaigns in Colorado and she says Ceballos and Gosar and great candidates. 

"If people are willing to consider these candidates individually on their merits at least if not one will be elected."

Read more
Open Spaces
4:48 pm
Fri September 5, 2014

Democrat Pete Gosar Says The State Needs A Leader

Credit gosarforgovernor.com

The Democratic Candidate for Governor is Pete Gosar. Gosar is a Pinedale native who is the former chairman of the state democratic party and he currently serves on the state board of education.

He is a state pilot, a former school teacher, and in college he was a star defensive player for the Wyoming Cowboys. Gosar has been critical of Governor Mead’s leadership when it comes to issues like Medicaid expansion and has accused Mead of playing politics with his decisions. He joins us to discuss some issues.

Read more
Open Spaces
4:33 pm
Fri September 5, 2014

Wyoming’s Prison Education Programs Help Keep Recidivism Rates Low

State Penitentiery, Rawlins Wyoming.
Credit Stuart and Jen Robertson via Flickr Creative Commons

Wyoming’s prison system boasts the second best recidivism rate in the country. Twenty-five percent of offenders in the state will return to prison for a parole violation or new crime—compared to 40 percent nationally. The Wyoming Department of Corrections credits its education programs—including a mandatory G.E.D course for all inmates without a high school degree— with keeping inmates from landing back behind bars.

Zach Fuhrer dropped out of high school at age 17 and had no intention of ever setting foot in another classroom.

Read more
Open Spaces
4:33 pm
Fri September 5, 2014

Wyoming Inmates Prepare For Life On The Outside

Credit Wikimedia Commons

Inmates at Wyoming’s Medium Security Correctional Institution will need more than classroom instruction to succeed after they’re released—and there are a number of programs inside Torrington that try and prepare prisoners for the world outside the prison’s walls.

Tim Well’s prerelease course at Torrington looks more like a high school classroom than a prison. An inspirational quote is written on the blackboard, along with a checklist--3 cover letters, 2 job applications, and a resume--all to be completed before graduation. Today’s lesson is about money and parenting.

Read more
Open Spaces
4:24 pm
Fri September 5, 2014

PEN Open Book Award Gives Author Platform To Discuss Wyoming Immigrant Experiences

Credit Courtesy photo

Nina McConigley is the author of Cowboys and East Indians, and a recent winner of the PEN Open Book award. She joined Wyoming Public Radio’s Caroline Ballard to discuss the award and said the news of her win took a little time to reach her.

Read more
Open Spaces
4:22 pm
Fri September 5, 2014

UW American Heritage Center Looks At Immigration

University of Wyoming American Heritage Center
Credit Bob Beck

On September 18th and 19th the University of Wyoming American Heritage Center and a number of sponsors will be hosting what should be a fascinating symposium on Immigration. Leslie Waggener with the American Heritage Center explains the purpose of the symposium.

Read more
Open Spaces
4:09 pm
Fri September 5, 2014

INSIDE ENERGY: Wyoming Wind Gridlock

High Plains Wind Farm near McFadden, Wyoming on a breezy summer day.
Credit Leigh Paterson

Wyoming has some of the most powerful wind in the country. So, earlier this month, a massive wind farm got the green light from the state. If the Chokecherry and Sierra Madre Wind Energy Project gets federal approval, it will become the largest in the country. But who’s buying all that wind power? Right now there is no way to get it out of Wyoming, to the other states that really need it. For Inside Energy, Leigh Paterson reports on why transmission gridlocks are keeping Wyoming wind at bay.

Read more
Open Spaces
5:23 pm
Fri August 22, 2014

Landowners Connect To Negotiate With Pipeline Companies

Credit Hiland Crude, LLC.

There’s a huge, mostly invisible web of pipelines crisscrossing the country that make it possible for our stoves to light and our cars to turn on. Those pipelines run from oil and gas producing regions to refineries and processing plants, crossing miles of private property along the way. The people whose land they cross don’t often benefit, but a new strategy may help.

Read more
Open Spaces
5:08 pm
Fri August 22, 2014

INSIDE ENERGY: Why Is It So Hard To Study The Public Health Effects Of Oil And Gas Development?

Fracking the Bakken Shale Formation in North Dakota.
Credit Joshua Doubek, Wikimedia Commons

The current oil and gas boom, fueled by a technique called hydraulic fracturing, has opened massive shale gas and oil formations in states like Texas, Colorado, North Dakota, and Pennsylvania.

But unlike past booms, this time drilling is bumping right up against communities. With oil and gas development now at their doorsteps, people are worried about the health impacts.

But the industry has taken off so quickly that scientific research about those impacts - which is timely, costly, and complex - is playing catch up.

Read more

Pages