PacifiCorp

Oregon Says No To Coal-Fired Electricity

Mar 4, 2016
David Hanson

Oregon lawmakers have passed a landmark clean-energy bill that lays out a timeline for Oregonians to stop paying for electricity from coal-fired power plants through its two largest utilities, PacifiCorp and Portland General Electric.

Wyoming’s largest utility is backing an initiative that would make Oregon “coal-free” by 2030. 

Oregon currently gets a third of its power from coal, even though it has only one coal plant in the state. The rest comes from power plants in the region, including Wyoming’s Jim Bridger plant. Under the proposed bill, Oregon ratepayers wouldn’t pay for any electricity from coal plants after 2030.

Pacificorp, the parent company of Wyoming’s Rocky Mountain Power, is supporting the initiative. 

Stephanie Joyce

Creating a regional electricity grid would save money and allow for integration of more renewables, according to a new report.

 

Earlier this year, PacifiCorp, which provides electricity to a handful of western states like Wyoming, Utah and Oregon, announced that it was looking at merging its grid with California’s. Now, the company has come out with a report showing that could result in savings for the whole region.

 

A senior executive at one of the nation’s largest power companies says Wyoming needs to be working on solutions for compliance with the Clean Power Plan. The plan calls for a 30 percent reduction in carbon emissions from the power sector nationwide by 2030.

Chuck Abbe / Wikimedia Commons

The utility giant PacifiCorp has agreed to a $2.5 million dollar settlement over bird deaths at two of its wind farms in Wyoming.

PacifiCorp pleaded guilty to killing more than 300 birds, including 38 golden eagles. The Department of Justice says the company knew that its turbine siting at the farms outside of Glenrock would result in bird deaths. PacifiCorp spokesman David Eskelsen says the company disputes that characterization, but not the fine. 

“The law is the law and we’re committed to abide by the regulations,”  he said. 

The contractor hired to build three wind farms in Converse and Carbon counties has won a $1.4 million judgment against a dirt subcontractor for construction delays and costs.

A federal jury recently sided with Tetra Tech EC Inc. in its case against California-based Jerry Herling Construction Inc.

The jury determined that Jerry Herling Construction breached its contract by failing to pay its vendors. Some of those vendors are Wyoming businesses.

Tetra Tech is based in Pasadena, Calif.