upper green river basin

Cooper McKim

At the center of the dusty Pinedale-Anticline field looking over the Wind River Range, Erika Tokarz stands on Ultra Petroleum’s  Riverside 9-2 pad which is home to several wellheads. Across the road, workers in hard-hats and sunglasses crisscross the plot of land with a massive tower at its center, working to drill a hole for natural gas. 

 

Leigh Paterson

Emissions from facilities that treat oil and gas wastewater could contribute to ozone formation, according to a new study from the University of Wyoming. 

It’s not news that under the right conditions, oil and gas development can lead to more ground-level ozone, but oil and gas wastewater treatment hasn't previously been identified as a potential contributor.

Willow Belden

The Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality has released a strategy that includes regulations and voluntary recommendations to address Ozone problems in the Upper Green River Basin in western Wyoming. 

The goal is to keep ozone from exceeding recommended levels.  D-E-Q Air Quality Administrator Steve Dietrich said that the idea is to try and address problems before they start, noting that much of the focus will be on precursor emissions, or emissions that can cause ozone to reach non-attainment.